Professor and Deputy Dean for Academic Programs

About Ryan Kellogg

Ryan Kellogg is a professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and Deputy Dean for Academic Programs.  He is also a research associate at the National Bureau for Economic Research. Kellogg's research bridges industrial organization, energy economics, and environmental policy, examining topics such as the response of investment to uncertainty, the economic consequences of the shale boom, the economics of oil and gas leasing, the effectiveness of policies to reduce emissions from the transportation sector, and the economics of carbon regulation when the economic environment is uncertain.

Kellogg earned a PhD in Agricultural and Resource Economics from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2008. Prior to his graduate studies, he worked for BP in Houston, TX, and Anchorage, AK, for four years as an engineer and economic analyst. Kellogg earned a BS in Chemical Engineering and a BA in Economics from Rice University in 1999. He grew up outside of Cleveland, OH.

Selected publications

Anderson, Soren T., Ryan Kellogg, and Stephen W. Salant (2018), “Hotelling Under Pressure”, Journal of Political Economy.

Kellogg, Ryan (2018), “Gasoline Price Uncertainty and the Design of Fuel Economy Standards”, Journal of Public Economics.

Hausman, Catherine and Ryan Kellogg (2015), “Welfare and Distributional Implications of Shale Gas”, Brookings Papers on Economic Activity.

Kellogg, Ryan (2014), “The Effect of Uncertainty on Investment: Evidence from Texas Oil Drilling”, American Economic Review.

Anderson, Soren T., Ryan Kellogg, and James M. Sallee (2013), “What Do Consumers Believe About Future Gasoline Prices?Journal of Environmental Economics and Management.

Kellogg, Ryan (2011), “Learning by Drilling: Inter-Firm Learning and Relationship Persistence in the Texas Oilpatch”, Quarterly Journal of Economics.

Auffhammer, Maximilian and Ryan Kellogg (2011), “Clearing the Air? The Effects of Gasoline Content Regulation on Air Quality”, American Economic Review.