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Spotlight with Anjali Adukia

Learn about the highlights of Anjali Adukia's research discussed in the paper "What We Teach About Race and Gender: Representation in Images and Text of Children's Books."

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Anjali Adukia

Anjali Adukia
Assistant Professor

Adukia is interested in understanding how to reduce inequalities such that children from historically disadvantaged backgrounds have equal opportunities to fully develop their potential.  Her research is focused on understanding factors that motivate and shape behavior, preferences, attitudes, and educational decision-making, with a particular focus on early-life influences.  She examines how the provision of basic needs—such as safety, health, justice, and representation—can increase school participation and improve child outcomes in developing contexts.

Read Anjali Adukia's full bio


Masterclass with Chris Blattman

A faculty member in The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts, Blattman focuses on why some people and societies are poor, unequal and violent, and how to tackle these issues. His book, Why We Fight, was released by Viking Press in April 2022. Most people think war is easy and peace is hard. Blattman synthesizes decades of social science and policymakers' practical experiences to argue the opposite: War is hard and finding peace is easier than you think

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Chris Blattman

Chris Blattman
Assistant Professor

In his day-to-day research, Blattman works with governments and civil society to design and test approaches to reduce violence and poverty. Some of his ongoing work investigates:

  • How are street gangs and other criminal groups organized in Colombia? Working with the government and civil society, Blattman tests ways to reduce the power of gangs to govern and extort civilians.
  • What causes street violence and shootings in cities ranging from Chicago to Monrovia? Can we predict what young men are likely to be violent and help them avoid this path? Blattman is studying how employment and cognitive behavior therapy programs can reduce killings.
  • Why do hostile groups hold onto false beliefs about one another? From India to America, what are the psychological drivers of persistent prejudice?

Read Chris Blattman's full bio


Faculty Spotlight with Fiona Burlig

Hear from Fiona Burlig, Assistant Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research for a session discussing her research titled: "The Value of Forecasts: Experimental Evidence from Developing-Country Agriculture"

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Fiona Burlig

Fiona Burlig
Assistant Professor

Fiona Burlig is an Assistant Professor at the Harris School of Public Policy and a Faculty Research Fellow at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She studies energy and environmental economics, with a focus on the developing world. Her recent research examines the impacts of rural electrification in India, uses machine learning methods to quantify the effectiveness of energy efficiency upgrades, and proposes tools for designing randomized controlled trials.

Read Fiona Burlig's full bio


Masterclass with John Burrows

Learn about leadership and negotiations, how these skills are important to your future career, and how your curriculum at Harris can help you develop or sharpen these skills.

John Burrows Senior Lecturer

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John Burrows

John Burrows is senior lecturer in leadership at the University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy and an associate fellow at Oxford University’s Saïd Business School. At the University of Chicago and Oxford, John teaches leadership, negotiations, strategy, decision-making, and organizational psychology to MPP, MBA, and MA students, and to senior executives in open enrollment and custom executive-education programs.Read John Burrows' full bio


Masterclass with David Chrisinger

In this session David Chrisinger, Writing Program Director, Lecturer, and author of Stories Are What Save Us, hosts a short workshop on the "shapes of stories." Chrisinger argues that a single story shape, the "person-in-hole" story, is especially useful in policy communication, whether you're telling a story about yourself, your community, or your organization. This is an ideal event for students interested in learning more about the power of storytelling and to help workshop ideas you may be considering for essays, motivational statements, or other prompts requiring you to share your personal narrative. 

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David Chrisinger

David Chrisinger
Program Director, Harris Writing Program; Lecturer

David Chrisinger is the Associate Director in the Academic and Student Affairs office, where he leads the Harris Writing Program. In his role, David will work with faculty to develop and evaluate writing-focused assignments, assist students in improving their writing skills, and train and manage the Writing Program Teaching Assistants, among other duties. 

Read David Chrisinger's full bio


Masterclass with Thomas Coleman

Thomas Coleman shares what students can expect to learn and what differentiates UChicago economics from other institutions. This session will focus on "Monetary Theory and Chicago Economics: How Milton Friedman and Anna Schwartz saved the world in 2008."

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Thomas Coleman

Thomas Coleman

Senior Lecturer

Thomas Coleman, PhD'84, is focused on teaching students about financial markets. In 2012 Coleman returned to the University of Chicago, first as Executive Director and Senior Advisor at the Becker Friedman Institute for Research in Economics and then in 2015 as lecturer at Harris. Prior to returning to the University of Chicago, Coleman worked in the finance industry for over twenty years, with considerable experience in trading, risk management, and quantitative modeling.

Read Thomas Coleman's full bio


Anthony Fowler
Anthony Fowler

Masterclass with Anthony Fowler

In this Masterclass session, Professor Anthony Fowler will present "Are American voters really so polarized, partisan, or irrational?" The presentation will touch on the research methodologies used to analyze and interpret the data, as well as how the insights gained can help future policy leaders make both smarter decisions and more effective policy.

Professor Anthony Fowler

Professor Fowler’s research applies econometric methods for causal inference to questions in political science, with particular emphasis on elections and political representation. Specific interests include unequal political participation, electoral selection and incentives, political polarization, and the credibility of empirical research. He is an editor-in-chief of the Quarterly Journal of Political Science, an author of Thinking Clearly with Data, and a host of Not Another Politics Podcast.

Read Anthony Fowler's full bio


Eyal Frank
Eyal Frank

Masterclass with Eyal Frank

In this session, Assistant Professor Eyal Frank  presents "The Economics and Policy of Biodiversity Management."

Eyal Frank
Assistant Professor

An environmental economist, Frank works at the intersection of ecology and economics, addressing three broad questions: (i) how do natural inputs, namely animals, contribute to different production functions of interest, (ii) how do market dynamics reduce natural habitats and lead to declining wildlife population levels, and (iii) what are the costs, indirect ones in particular, of conservation policies. 

In his research, Frank uses natural experiments and econometric techniques to explore policy impacts on natural resources and biodiversity.

Read Eyal Frank's full bio


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Peter Ganong

Masterclass with Peter Ganong

In this session, Gangong gives a glimpse into the data analytics Harris students learn.

Peter Ganong
Associate Professor

Ganong is an economist who studies the effect of public policies on people facing difficult financial circumstances. In his research on the foreclosure crisis, he found that most borrowers defaulted due to insufficient liquidity and that many foreclosures could have been averted through liquidity-focused modifications to mortgages. He also has found that unemployment benefits play a crucial role in sustaining the consumption of unemployed workers. In ongoing work, he is studying the effects of racial wealth inequality and the effects of high liquidity on the US economy.

Read Peter Ganong's full bio


Masterclass with Justin Marlowe

In this session, Justin Marlowe shares his insights on public finance.

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Justin Marlowe

Justin Marlowe
Research Professor

Dr. Justin Marlowe is a research professor at Harris Public Policy. He is an admitted expert witness in federal and state courts and has served on technical advisory bodies for the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, the Government Finance Officers Association, the National Academies of Science, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, several state and local governments, and many other public, private, and non-profit organizations. In this Masterclass, Dr. Marlowe will share his extensive expertise in the world of public finance, with emphasis on public capital markets, infrastructure finance, state and local budgeting, and financial disclosure.Read Justin Marlowe's full bio


Masterclass with James Robinson

In this session, "The Self-Organizing Periphery" with Professor James Robinson, shares his research using data on the organization and behavior of Colombian paramilitary groups.

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James Robinson

James Robinson

The Reverend Dr. Richard L. Pearson Professor of Global Conflict Studies; Institute Director, The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts

As Institute Director, James A. Robinson is guiding The Pearson Institute’s research agenda, engaging the international academic and practitioner community through The Pearson Global Forum, and setting the curriculum for the next generation of leaders and scholars.

Read James Robinson's full bio


Konstantin Sonin
Konstantin Sonin

Masterclass with Konstantin Sonin

In this session, John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor Konstantin Sonin discusses the models, theories, and empirical aspects of his recently co-authored paper, “Isolation and Insurrection: How Partisanship and Political Geography Fueled January 6, 2021.” The study used granular location data from 40 million mobile devices to show that political isolation amplified the effect of partisanship on participation.

Konstantin Sonin
John Dewey Distinguished Service Professor

Professor Sonin earned his MSc and PhD in mathematics from Moscow State University and MA in economics from Moscow’s New Economic School. His research interests include political economics, conflict, development, and economic theory. In addition to his academic work, Sonin has been writing columns, Op-Eds, and a blog on Russian political and economic issues.

Read Konstantin Sonin's full bio


Masterclass with Paula Worthington

Hear from Paula Worthington on "Infrastructure in the Post-Pandemic 21st Century."

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Paula Worthington

Paula Worthington
Senior Lecturer

Paula R. Worthington is a Senior Lecturer at the Harris School of Public Policy at the University of Chicago, where she also serves as academic director of the School’s Policy Labs program and faculty lead on its MPP program. At Harris, Worthington teaches courses in state and local government and cost-benefit analysis and advises students completing applied projects for public and nonprofit sector clients.

Read Paula Worthington's full bio


Masterclass with Austin Wright

In this session, Austin Wright shares research on the January 6, 2021 insurrection in Washington, D.C..

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Austin Wright

Austin Wright
Assistant Professor

Professor Wright is a faculty affiliate of The Pearson Institute for the Study and Resolution of Global Conflicts, the Empirical Studies of Conflict Project, and non-resident fellow of the Liechtenstein Institute. His research leverages microlevel data to study the political economy of conflict and crime in Afghanistan, Colombia, Indonesia, and Iraq. His work is supported by the National Science Foundation, Niehaus Center for Global Governance, The Asia Foundation, and World Bank.Read Austin Wright's full bio

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