There’s a lot of noise created by our constant news cycle, but few ways to grasp what’s really going on in politics today. Not Another Politics Podcast provides a fresh perspective on the biggest political stories by focusing on research and data, not pundits and politicians.

Understand the political science beyond the headlines with Harris School of Public Policy Professors William Howell, Anthony Fowler, and Wioletta Dziuda.

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Listen and subscribe via Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, RSS feed, or wherever you get your podcasts.

See the full list of Not Another Politics Podcast episodes below.

Podcasts by Harris students

UC3P is the podcast network produced by students at Harris Public Policy. UC3P includes the podcasts Thank You for Your Service, The Walk-Ons, Kinda Sorta Brown, and more. 

 

One of the most anticipated developments of the 2020 election is who Democratic Presidential nominee, Joe Biden, will pick to be his running mate. One thing is certain, whoever he picks will be a woman. 
The killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Rayshard Brooks, and many other black people at the hands of police have driven nationwide protests. To be true to our mission, we want to look at this complex moment through the lens of research.
Professor Jorg Spenkuch from Northwestern University provides insight that political accountability takes a big hit during disasters.
The 2020 election will soon be upon us. As usual, news outlets will play a crucial role informing the public about the candidates. But could their decisions actual swing elections?
One of the concerns of the coronavirus is how we’ll handle voting in the 2020 election. A recent paper from soon to be Asst. Prof at UCLA, Dan Thompson, gives us the best data yet on how vote-by-mail effects turn out and partisans differences in election.
One of the stories of the coronavirus outbreak has been that Democrats and Republicans can’t agree on a shared set of facts about the virus. But groundbreaking research from political scientist Gregory Huber at Yale University questions the narrative.