How can we best meet the challenges of global health policy?

The Center for Health Policy integrates health policy education and research at Harris, mobilizes resources in health policy from throughout the University of Chicago, and serves as a platform for collaboration with best-in-class US and international schools. Through rigorous and innovative training and cross-national experiences, the center aims to develop a new class of healthcare leaders that carry global policy visions and are best prepared to answer challenges in health policy formulation and implementation.

Teaching in health policy at Harris is provided through its master’s and PhD programs and a unique partnership with Chicago Booth School of Business and the School of Social Service Administration through the Graduate Program in Health Administration and Policy. Some executive courses are taught in condensed formats appropriate for busy professionals who seek training outside of traditional degree programs. Harris offers a wide variety of health policy courses: Comparative Healthcare Systems: Lessons and Opportunities for Reform; Health Economics; Advanced Methods in Comparative Effectiveness Research; Health Economics and Public Policy; Leadership and Negotiations in Healthcare; and From Health Policy to Clinical Practice, to name a few.

Research in health policy at the University of Chicago is performed by over 100 faculty at Harris, the Division of Biological Sciences (including the Pritzker School of Medicine), the School of Social Service Administration, Chicago Booth School of Business, the Social Sciences Division, and the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago.

Co-Directors:

Joseph Antoun
Phone: 317.459.1890
[email protected]
 
David Meltzer
[email protected]

David Meltzer

Professor

David Meltzer

David O. Meltzer is currently leading a Centers for Medicaid and Medicare Innovation Challenge award to study the effects of improved continuity in doctor patient relationships on the costs and outcomes of care for frequently hospitalized Medicare patients.